This book is twelve dense and lyrical stories whose only connection is the city of London and the character that is trapped there The interesting premise is never really achieved, however, as Norton sometimes seems to be absent mindedly, or maybe as an afterthought, placed into the stories and there is no real overall story arc I was expecting something a little bit like If on a winter s night a traveler , which although metafictional, surreal, and poetic, also had a strong story, characters and better utilized its strong fantastic premise Sinclair is an excellent writer but these stories read like modified poetry, as impressions or poetic sentiments than narrative prose Sinclair s repeated use of endless sentence fr Hey, hey, you Pay no mind to the dismissive pooh poohing of these other reviews Disgruntled Neil Gaiman fans I m willing to bet, but give them no heed This book is absolute gold.
Slow Chocolate Autopsy tells the tale of Norton, a man who, like Billy Pilgrim, has come unstuck in time, but finds himself confined whithin the constantly shifting perimeters of London City, from the coarse antiquity of Marlowe to the grim austerity of present day Thatcherite Britain Because of this, Norton is doomed to wander the haunted avenues of his memories and the memories of other infamous London visionaries, trying to stay alive and retain his dwindling sanity Sinclair s use of poetic language and imagery is beautiful, unorthodox and hypnotic, designed to reflect the mind of a man who has lost grip of reality and self, clinging only onto the ever changing and utterly squalid p The Hero, Travels Through London S Underbelly Trapped In Space But Not In Time He Is Present To Witness Dark Deeds From Deptford At The Time Of Marlowe S Death And In The East Endduring The Sixties Watching The Murder Of Jack Th Hat McVitie Bizarre And Phantasmagoric, The Book Draws On Images Of The City From The Rennaissance To The Deacy Of Thatcher S [ read Online Slow Chocolate Autopsy Í world-war-i PDF ] by Iain Sinclair º London It took me 4 attempts to read this book The sheer strangeness of it beat me every time except for the last where I simply ploughed through it and hoped for the best And I m glad I did, it s a very odd book with a very odd style and it has the amazing ability to make you smile whilst giving you a migraine at the same time This sounds worse than it is, most children possess this ability also They also share a way of speaking with this book in that it s disjointed, non linear and occasionally nonsensical This book uses bigger words though and makes of a point I d have to say I prefer this book to most children Unless there are children out there writing better books of course.
Slow Chocolate Autopsy é Oh, Christ on a crutch This was a conundrum This book was like a compound riddle, wherein you need to solve enigmas to get clues to solve bigger ones to solve bigger ones I was forced to make a choice 1 Do I work harder to get all of the references If I really dig down deep, will the plot become clear or2 Do I accept that the clear picture I am looking for isn t there, and take the thing at face value, which still requires a hell of a lot of digging I ultimately chose option 2, reading the book almost as poetry Characters disappear, change aspect, become shadows It s like late Kerouac Actually, its a little fun, because Kerouac never offered that choice With him, you just accepted that it was poetry It was kind of fun, if totally frustrating, to force myself to really commit to trying to eliminate the possibility that there was a skeleton key t I was drawn to Iain Sinclair s book from the appearance of its main character although I suspect Sinclair would like his readers to belief that Norton isn t a character at all in Century 1910 volume of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Norton and his predicament seemed interesting enough and, when our friend came to visit us from London, I asked her to get me that book and now that I ve finally finished it for the first time I have a feeling that I ll return to in the future I m not quite sure if its a true masterpiece of literary psychogeography or pretentious postmodern rubbish I suspect that the truth lies somewhere in between, but I m also certain that my knowledge of London s geography and history is not Sinclair, known quantity Past work Non fiction, stories of the city Mundane mysticism Magic of the wasteground Beauty in poverty Nostalgia for dog turds Style Broken mirror Reflections, ugly or beautiful depending on angle Interesting patterns Start small Minor inconveniences Sexism, racism, homophobia Casual or intended Who knows.
Single work or multiple source Behind dresser, under sofa, recovered fragments repackaged as new Who cares.
Fraud hipster bait, tilted urinal, paint spackle as magic eye picture Maybe not.
Private function, members only, password please, no Homers Maybe so.
Whats the story, morning glory Story is the story, narrative as narrative If Narrative Narrative, then Narrative Anything Anything Bollocks then Narrative Bollocks.
Selling point Make something up Norton Trapped in space within



It s a ghost story Norton drifts through the book, sometimes in full view and other times like a whisper It achieves the atmosphere of London and I think this is essentially its primary aim I didnt enjoy it though apart from the football chapter which is excellent for two main reasons some of which the author himself recognises at the end of the book.
The first is that the prose, after a while, just became too heavy It s dense and at times beutifully poetic but unfortunately I don t think Sinclair ever changes gears I found that quite tiring.
Secondly, and this was a bigger problem for me, if you re going to use offensive language then it s either the author or the character The majority of these characters didn t come across to me like they would use the descriptions that are used in the textas such, one is left musing the real reason for some of the grim and off Some books are weird and fascinating Other books are weird and cool Still, some books are fascinating and cool And weird This book is too weird to be fascinating or cool It being weird did not serve any aesthetic rationale nor fulfill any artistic purpose It was weird for weirdness sake but it doesn t even succeed at that Boredom even for the totally hip beyond hip, or uber cool crowd and by cool I mean patient lover of books sets in within seconds of reading the first few lines on the first page, and the reader is cautioned against Oh I ll keep at it and giving this rubbish any of a chance, unless the reader is already mad or supra nihilistic Recommended use Seek a used copy and send to someone you loathe as a present Sinclair s subtitle is Incidents from the Notorious Career of Norton, Prisoner of London.
Incidents is the apt word The book has twelve sections, four of them graphic narratives illustrated by Dave McKean, the remarkable graphic artist who works frequently with Neal Gaiman All twelve sections could be called stories, given how loose that category has become, but they are clearly not chapters in a novel, no matter how loosely that category might be defined There is murder, ghosts, miserable day labor, a mysterious nighttime soccer match, and a evening with the British mid 20th century crime scene Norton is there, whether the time is the present day or the 16th century, sometimes as a central character, at other time a peripheral presence Once he is glimpsed only as a laborer who leav

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